What to look for in a translator

translator

What to discuss with your language provider to make sure you get the best from your translation service

Anyone considering communicating with foreign clients in any way – by means of a website, advertising campaign, social media, PR, blog or any form of commercial activity – should have full confidence in their language provider. Since you will be leaving them in charge of talking to foreign clients on your behalf, it goes without saying that you should check out your translator’s credentials in order to avoid major mishaps.

Read on to make sure you know what to look out for.

Where are they from? Where do they live ?

It’s not rocket science, but we’ll never say it enough : it is best to work with a person whose native language is their target language, ie the one they’re translating into, because growing up speaking a language is the only way to fully grasp it. This is the number one industry standard that you should adhere to, even if you decide to ignore every other piece of advice.

It is sometimes argued that translators should be based in the country of their target language, too, but the argument is a little flawed: it would be difficult, at best, to reach a decent grasp of another language without spending sufficient time reading it, listening to it and speaking it with native speakers. And where is the best place to do that?

It is true however that translators should keep in touch with their native language, so you might want to ask them how they go about that (for example, I live in the UK, but I read in French, watch French TV and listen to French radio, and I speak French to my kids).

Are they qualified ?

Seems kind of obvious now we mention it, right ? Believe it or not, being bilingual doesn’t make someone a good translator. The specialist skill of translating is learned through studying, experience, mentoring, or a combination of all of the above. In the UK, you can look for qualifications such as the CIoL’s Diploma in Translation or the ITI qualified membership. In the US, the ATA’s certification is the most common qualification. If they’re not qualified, how much and what type of experience do they have?

Are they specialised?

Think of a translator’s specialisation as their second set of skills. It’s all jolly well and good being able to speak and write in more than one language, but you need to have an idea of what you’re talking about. The clients’ requirements and objectives are not the same for a legal document as they are for a marketing campaign or a book. So, have they translated anything similar before and how much do they already know about your industry?

SEO

If your copy is written with the objective of influencing traffic towards a website, the translator needs to have a reasonable understanding of how search engines work and they need to know what keywords you’re banking on. So, look for a translator / copywriter who knows how search engines work and is experienced in incorporating keywords to their copy in a natural way.

Quality control

Even the best translators can get square-eyed from looking at the same text over a long period of time, and they’ll be the first to admit the importance of proof-reading. Proof-reading is best done either after a few days not looking at the copy, or by a different reader. It’s a good idea to discuss options with your provider. If you’d like them to proof-read their own work, make sure they have enough time to do it properly. They may suggest their own proof-reader (make sure you clarify who is paying for their time) or leave it with you to manage (read my article on the challenges of proof-reading someone else’s work).

Confidentiality

It should go without saying that any document entrusted by a client to their translator should not be shared with anyone else but for added peace of mind, you can ask them to sign a Non-Disclosure Agreement.